The Books for All initiative

The US government is launching a new program called Books for All. Its purpose is to make free ebooks and ebook readers available to kids from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. It’s a great idea and I hope it really takes off.

My parent publisher, Hachette, has included The Innocent Mage in the first round of books being made available. This makes me so pleased, I can’t tell you! If you’re on Twitter (I’m not, I have enough trouble keeping up with a blog!) it would be great if you could pass along the news.

Book-signing at Forbidden Planet, London

Here’s exciting news! I’ll be signing The Falcon Throne (and any other books bearing my name) at London’s premier science fiction bookshop Forbidden Planet while I’m in town. The details are as follows:

Forbidden Planet

179 Shaftesbury Ave, London

Saturday September 13th, between noon and 1 pm.

If you’re in London town, I hope you can make it.

United Kingdom Ebook Promotion for The Falcon Throne

Orbit UK has launched a limited-time offer to purchase the UK ebook edition of  The Falcon Throne at a very good price. If you’re an ebook reader and you live in the UK, you might like to take advantage of it while you can. For readers in other regions, please stay tuned …

Here are the links:

Here’s a teaser for The Falcon Throne

The Falcon Throne, first book in my new series The Tarnished Crown, will be released in Australia/New Zealand on August 28th, and in the US and UK on September 9th. It’s available for pre-order now via various online and bricks-and-mortar bookshops. Check the Where to Buy links for your best option, no matter where you live.

To get you in the mood, I’d like to share an excerpt from Chapter One …

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Brassy-sweet, a single wavering trumpet blast rent the cold air. The destriers reared, ears flattened, nostrils flaring, then charged each other with the ferocity of war.

Huzzah!’ the joust’s excited onlookers shouted, throwing handfuls of barley and rye into the pale blue sky. The dry seeds fell to strike their heads and shoulders and the trampled, snow-burned grass beneath their feet. Blackbirds, bold as pirates, shrieked and squabbled over the feast as children released from the working day’s drudgery shook rattles, clanged handbells, blew whistles and laughed.

Oblivious to all save sweat and fear and the thunder of hooves, the two battling nobles dropped their reins and lowered their blunted lances. A great double crash as both men found their marks. Armour buckled, bodies swayed, clods of turf flew. Their destriers charged on despite each brutal strike.

With a muffled cry, his undamaged lance falling, abandoned, Ennis of Larkwood lurched half out of his saddle, clawed for his dropped reins, lost his balance and fell. For three strides his horse dragged him, both arms and his untrapped leg flailing wildly, helmeted head bouncing on the tussocked dirt. Then the stirrup-leather broke and he was free. Squires burst from the sidelines like startled pheasants, two making for the snorting horse, three rushing to their fallen lord.

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